Calendar

Mar
25
Sat
Beginner Birding—Winter Water Birds around Montauk: Adults/Children
Mar 25 @ 10:00 am

Walk Leader: Crystal Oakes, South Fork Natural History Museum (SoFo) Nature Educator

Many people think that there isn’t a lot of variety in nature in the winter, but Long Island is a wintering spot for over 20 species of water birds. Fight cabin fever when you join Crystal to explore the salt and fresh water in the Montauk area in this beginning birding walk. Learn about the different body shapes, behaviors, and field marks (obvious visual clues) to tell the differences between loons, ducks, geese, and grebes and then identify the individual species. Having your favorite field guide to birds of eastern North America and binoculars will be very helpful. There are a limited number of binoculars to borrow, if you need a pair.

Advance reservations are required for all events. For more information, reservations, and directions to meeting places, please call: (631) 537-9735.

Photo Credit: Kim B. / CC BY-SA 3.0

Searching for Seals & Winter Walk: Adults/Children 6+
Mar 25 @ 11:30 am

Walk Leader: Xylia Serafy, South Fork Natural History Museum (SoFo) Nature Educator

With the cold of winter, many northern animal visitors come to the South Shore of Long Island to find food, among them Pinniped—or seals. The three most common species of seals that visit Long Island at this time of year are Harbor Seals, Gray Seals, and Harp Seals. Join Xylia on a walk toward the bay at Cupsogue Beach County Park, where at low tide you can expect to see some of these seals sunning themselves on the distant sandbar. It may be cold and windy, so please bundle up.

Advance reservations are required for all events. For more information, reservations, and directions to meeting places, please call: (631) 537-9735.

Spotted and Blue-spotted Salamander Search with Andy: All Ages
Mar 25 @ 8:00 pm

Walk Leader: Andy Sabin, President, South Fork Natural History Museum (SoFo) Board of Directors

On this walk to one of our vernal ponds, we’ll be searching for the Spotted Salamander, one of our four native mole salamanders. This salamander is a beauty, with its shiny black body and bright yellow spots. It, like the Eastern Tiger Salamander and the Blue-spotted Salamander, as well as the early-autumn breeding Marbled Salamander, is called a mole salamander because it spends most of its time underground. Please bring a flashlight and wear boots, as late winter rains will make the ground soggy. This walk will take place only if there have been heavy rains.

Advance reservations are required for all events. For more information, reservations, and directions to meeting places, please call: (631) 537-9735.

Apr
1
Sat
Who Lives Under a Rock? Children Ages 3-6
Apr 1 @ 10:30 am

Program Leader: Ashley Federici, South Fork Natural History Museum (SoFo) Nature Educator

As the seasons change and weather grows warmer, animals and insects seek shelter in places that are damp and cool, like the space between rocks and the soil below. Join Ashley for her favorite pastime—playing in the dirt—as we look for and learn about earthworms, pill bugs, millipedes, and whatever else we can find!

Advance reservations are required for all events. For more information, reservations, and directions to meeting places, please call: (631) 537-9735.

Photo Credit: Crystal Oakes

The Benefits of Planting Native—It Matters! Adults
Apr 1 @ 2:00 pm

Program Leader: Xylia Serafy, South Fork Natural History Museum (SoFo) Nature Educator      

Whether you’re thinking of sprucing up your garden or creating a sustainable backyard habitat, native plants have a lot to offer. Local development over the last century—the construction of new homes, factories, and shopping centers—has changed the landscape, once replete with native plants and ecologically productive habitats for many organisms, into landscaped lawns and gardens full of exotic and ornamental plants. Although aesthetically pleasing, the introduction of alien plant species is known to sever food webs, out-compete native plant species, and degrade the habitat of our remaining natural areas. Join Xylia for a discussion on the importance of using native plants on your property and learn just how easy it is to turn your backyard into a biologically diverse sanctuary!

Advance reservations are required for all events. For more information, reservations, and directions to meeting places, please call: (631) 537-9735.

Photo Credit: Xylia Serafy

Apr
5
Wed
Museum Closed for Maintenance
Apr 5 all-day
Apr
8
Sat
Book Club—New Members Welcome! The Moth Snowstorm: Nature & Joy: Adults
Apr 8 @ 10:00 am

Club Leader: Lisa Kiss

We welcome new members to SoFo’s once-a-month discussion group featuring books about nature, science, and environmental issues. Join us for coffee, tea, pastries, and stimulating conversation. Club member’s book-suggestions are always welcome.

This month we’ll be discussing The Moth Snowstorm by Michael McCarthy. Andrea Wulf, in The New York Times Book Review, says, “McCarthy takes his readers on an idiosyncratic and wonderful walk through his joy of nature. Like some of the greatest nature books, from Thoreau’s Walden to Annie Dillard’s Pilgrim at Tinker Creek, it’s a personal book that describes McCarthy’s own journey while at the same time folding his experiences within a broader context. …The Moth Snowstorm is an inspiring book, and I salute McCarthy for his boldness. Rather than the dire, dry statistical projections often heralded to make the case for conservation, he turns boldly to joy — to imagination and emotion.”

Advance reservations are required for all events. For more information, reservations, and directions to meeting places, please call: (631) 537-9735.

Private SoFo Tour of the Quogue Wildlife Refuge & Nature Center: Family
Apr 8 @ 10:30 am – 12:00 pm

Tour Leader: Quogue Nature Educator

The Quogue Wildlife Refuge is a 300-acre non-profit nature preserve founded in 1934, and is home to diverse wildlife. Open 365 days a year from sunrise to sunset, there are seven miles of trails to explore as well as diverse habitats, including forests and ponds as well as the ecologically rare Dwarf Pines in the Pine Barrens. The Refuge’s main trail is wheelchair and stroller friendly.

The Outdoor Wildlife Complex houses permanently injured wildlife that require human care to survive including a bald eagle, owls, falcons, foxes and other native New York animals.

Inside the Charles Banks Belt Nature Center you will find a warm and friendly environment where you can observe wildlife through huge windows that overlook Old Ice Pond. A variety of exhibits, turtles, snakes, a touch table, a children’s room, and a sitting area with a beautiful view of the pond can be enjoyed inside of the Nature Center. Prior to becoming a wildlife preserve, the Quogue Ice Company harvested ice on Old Ice Pond. On the grounds you can visit the Ice Harvesting Museum that has authentic, century-old tools.

The Refuge is a great place to take the family—there’s something there for every family member. Please expect to make a $5 per person contribution to the Refuge for this tour.

Advance reservations are required for all events. For more information, reservations, and directions to meeting places, please call: (631) 537-9735.

The Ins & Outs of Stingrays—Stingray Dissection: Adults/Children Ages 8+
Apr 8 @ 10:30 am

Workshop Leader: Lila Glansberg, South Fork Natural History Museum, Nature Education Intern

Stingrays are some of the coolest fishes swimming in the ocean, and are very common in Long Island waters! Do stingrays have scales? How are they different from other fish? Do they have a sense of smell? Get up close and personal with stingrays at this fun and educational program. We will be looking at both the internal and external features of stingrays and learning all about what makes them unique. Material fee: $20.

Advance reservations are required for all events. For more information, reservations, and directions to meeting places, please call: (631) 537-9735.

Photo Credit: Barry Peters

Apr
9
Sun
Bursting Buds—Let’s Look Inside: Children Ages 3-5
Apr 9 @ 10:30 am

Workshop Leader: Melanie Meade, South Fork Natural History Museum (SoFo) Nature Educator

In the spring, when the trees wake up and start growing again, their buds burst open with new green leaves. Let’s take a walk and search for new buds on tree branches. How many different ones can we find? What will the new leaves look like? We’ll collect and open some buds to look inside for new leaves and make twig prints to take home. Material fee: $3

Advance reservations are required for all events. For more information, reservations, and directions to meeting places, please call: (631) 537-9735.