Calendar

Jan
20
Sun
NYSOA 2019 Winter Waterfowl Count: Adults/Teens – Free Event
Jan 20 all-day

Count Leader: Frank Quevedo, Executive Director, South Fork Natural History Museum

At one time, a great variety of waterfowl wintered on Long Island; now, due to habitat loss, food scarcity, and the introduction of nonnative species of water birds, our wintering population of waterfowl is slowly diminishing. To assess this situation and record the number of overwintering waterfowl, the New York State Ornithological Association (NYSOA) sponsors an annual waterfowl count throughout the State. If you are an experienced or intermediate birder, we would be delighted to have you join us. To do so, call count leader Frank Quevedo at 631.537.9735 for detailed information.

Advance reservations are required for all events. For more information, reservations, and directions to meeting places, please call: (631) 537-9735.

Jan
21
Mon
Full Wolf Moon Hike at SOFO with Friends of the Long Pond Greenbelt: All Ages – Free Event
Jan 21 @ 6:30 pm

Photo Credit: Michael Gil

Cosponsored by Friends of the Long Pond Greenbelt and South Fork Natural History Museum

Walk Leader: Dai Dayton, President, Friends of the Long Pond Greenbelt

Legend has it that native tribes related this moon to the nighttime howling of wolves. Join us to mark the first of the year’s full moons on this leisurely paced one-hour hike through open-field trails and, afterward, warm up with some light refreshments and convivial conversation. This is a free program.

Advance reservations are required for all events. For more information, reservations, and directions to meeting places, please call: (631) 537-9735.

Jan
26
Sat
Long Island’s White Shark Research—SOFO’s Shark Research and Education Program Update with Greg Metzger: Adult/Teen
Jan 26 @ 10:30 am

Photo Credit: OCEARCH / R. Snow

Program Presenter: Greg Metzger, Chief Field Coordinator for the South Fork Natural History Museum Shark Research and Education Program

The South Fork Natural History Museum is one of the newest organizations to begin studying the large coastal sharks found along the south shore of Long Island. We have been specifically targeting young-of-the-year (YOY) white sharks for electronic tagging purposes. The tags have begun to give us information on their movement at this stage of their life cycle, about which virtually nothing is known. This lecture will update the public on the highlights of the 2018 field season, as well as what we have learned over our four years of work.

Advance reservations are required for all events. For more information, reservations, and directions to meeting places, please call: (631) 537-9735.

Jan
27
Sun
Birds & Beaks—Specialized Adaptations: Children ages 6-8
*New STEAM based Programing
Jan 27 @ 10:30 am

Photo Credit: winnu

Program Presenter: Miles Todaro, South Fork Natural History Museum Environmental Educator

Ever wondered why birds have so many different types of beaks? Some are short, some are long, some are pointy and some are round. Join us in exploring the different benefits of all sorts of bird beaks through a fun activity all about adaptation. Afterwards, we’ll graph our results and talk about why things turned out the way they did.

Advance reservations are required for all events. For more information, reservations, and directions to meeting places, please call: (631) 537-9735.

Feb
1
Fri
Museum Closed for Scout Program: 3-4pm
Feb 1 @ 3:00 pm – 4:00 pm
Feb
2
Sat
Birding with Frank: Shinnecock Specialties: Adults/Teens
Feb 2 @ 10:00 am

Photo Credit: Bert de Tilly

Walk Leader: Frank Quevedo, Executive Director, South Fork Natural History Museum

The barrier beach area at Shinnecock is one of the few remaining undeveloped dune/salt marsh habitats on the eastern end of Long Island, an area that frequently has wintering Snowy Owls and Short-Eared Owls. Join Frank on this birding expedition at Shinnecock, one of SOFO’s most popular birding walks. If we’re lucky, we may see either of these two owls and even an American Bittern, Snow Bunting, or a lingering Clapper Rail. Bring binoculars and/or a spotting scope and a field guide to birds of the Eastern United States (if you have one). This walk is for adults and teens, although children over the age of 10 may attend. A shuttle bus will be available from SOFO to the birding location. Limited space is available on the bus; please register as soon as possible for this program if you would like a seat on the bus.

Advance reservations are required for all events. For more information, reservations, and directions to meeting places, please call: (631) 537-9735.

Hamptons Doc Fest Presentation—Salt of the Sea— Film Screening & Discussion with Filmmaker Tom Garber: Adults/Teens
Feb 2 @ 7:00 pm

Cosponsored by the Hamptons Doc Fest and the South Fork Natural History Museum

Salt of the Sea tells the story of a vanishing breed of independent commercial fishermen in New England. Filmed on several independently owned and operated boats in Long Island, Rhode Island, and Massachusetts over 18 months, the documentary shows what happens when a passion for fishing intersects with the power of politics. Contradictory governments’ regulations, corrupt enforcement, and a tough economy are contributing to the loss of a way of life that has existed for centuries. Running Time: 53 minutes.

Tom Garber, who lives in Hampton Bays, L.I., has produced ten documentaries that have aired on PBS and the Discovery Channel. His themes cover ordinary people in extraordinary circumstances. He graduated from the Film/Video Department of CalArts, where he mentored with Academy Award-winning filmmaker Terry Sanders. He has received several awards, including a NY Emmy, a Bronze Telly, Platinum and Silver REMI Awards, and a Gold Medal from the Charleston International Film Festival.

Advance reservations are required for all events. For more information, reservations, and directions to meeting places, please call: (631) 537-9735.

Feb
3
Sun
Snow Science with Melanie: Children ages 3-5
*New STEAM based Programming
Feb 3 @ 10:30 am

Program Leader: Melanie Meade, South Fork Natural History Museum Education Coordinator and Environmental Educator

Cold temperatures make water vapor in clouds turn into snow. The snow falls to the ground. Sometimes snow freezes together more and changes into ice. If we could look at snow and ice up closely, we would see crystals that sparkle when the sunlight bounces off them. We’ll take a walk outside to look for crystals and gather materials to make our own sparklers. We can make snow too, using a little simple kitchen science. Materials fee: $3

Advance reservations are required for all events. For more information, reservations, and directions to meeting places, please call: (631) 537-9735.

Feb
6
Wed
Museum Closed for Maintenance Day
Feb 6 all-day
Wintering Birds and How They Survive, with Frank Quevedo
Feb 6 @ 12:00 pm

Photo Credit: Evan Marks

Program Presenter: Frank Quevedo, Executive Director, South Fork Natural History Museum

Frank Quevedo, executive director of the South Fork Natural History Museum, will present a talk on winter birds, followed by a bird walk at Agawam Park. Much of Long Island and the northeast are designated as important wintering areas for migrating birds. Many sparrows, waterfowl, and owls visit us during the winter months. This presentation will show what birds they are, where they come from, and how they survive severe winter conditions. If you plan on participating in the bird walk, please bring binoculars.

Advance reservations are required for all events. For more information, reservations, and directions to meeting places, please call: (631) 537-9735.