Calendar

Jul
17
Tue
Surfrider Foundation and SoFo Beach Cleanup: All Ages
Jul 17 @ 6:00 pm

Cosponsored by the Surfrider Foundation and the South Fork Natural History Museum.

If you have ever been to the museum and spoken to any of our educators, you know how much we care about preserving the healthy, natural environment of the South Fork. This falls naturally into the mission of the museum itself which is: to stimulate interest in, advance knowledge of, and foster appreciation for the preservation of the natural environment. The SoFo staff has decided that—to uphold the mission of the museum—we need to take direct action to help keep Long Island habitats pollution-free. That’s why we are doing our “SoFo Cleans the Beach” programs. This summer we have teamed up with the Surfrider Foundation for an extra special cleanup! We hope you will join us for this joint program on our mission to pick up as much trash as possible. We will tally what type of trash we find and, when we are finished, weigh it out. Over time, we will be able to get an idea of the kind of trash that is washing up on our beaches, and we can knowledgeably advocate avoiding those materials in the future. We’re excited to continue and expand this program and hope you will join us in reaching our goal of keeping our hometown beaches pollution-free!

Advance reservations are required for all events. For more information, reservations, and directions to meeting places, please call: (631) 537-9735.

Jul
18
Wed
COME DRAW WITH US!—Art Workshop: Adults and Teens
Jul 18 @ 10:30 am

Drawing by Susan Rubin

Workshop Leader: Muriel Appelbaum. Muriel is a working artist with an MFA in Studio Art from Pratt Institute in NYC. She mostly draws from nature—landscapes, people, and live animals. See her artwork at www.murielappelbaum.com.

Drawing is another way of tuning into the natural world around us. When we look closely at a landscape or a seascape, we notice more about it. The same thing happens when we look closely at a leaf or at an animal. Notice how very different the shape of a box turtle’s shell is from the shell of a water turtle. Right! I guess that’s why it’s called a box turtle. Once I observed the difference in the shape of the two turtle shells, I could draw the outlines of the two shells. And the more I looked at the turtles, the more I saw. Observing differences is a good way to start tuning in to nature. If I had a dark-blue colored pencil, and one with a lighter blue lead, I could easily show myself the difference between the two colors on a piece of paper. Then I could look at the blue sky and notice it’s a different color near the horizon, compared to straight up. Now I could use the two blue colors in my drawing to show the difference. Shapes, colors, shadows—they tell us more about the natural world. I will be leading a drawing workshop at SoFo on most Wednesdays in July and August and on most weekends starting in September. Join us when you can. We’ll be using our observational skills to draw the natural world around us.

Advance reservations are required for all events. For more information, reservations, and directions to meeting places, please call: (631) 537-9735.

 

Additional Program Dates:

Wednesday, July 25— 10:30am

Wednesday, August 1— 10:30am

Wednesday, August 8— 10:30am

Wednesday, August 15— 10:30am

Wednesday, August 22— 10:30am

Wednesday, August 29— 10:30am

Saturday, September 15— 10:30am

Sunday, September 23— 10:30am

Saturday, September 29— 10:30am

Jul
20
Fri
Astronomy Night/Star Viewing with the Montauk Observatory: Adults/Children 8+
Jul 20 @ 8:30 pm

Cosponsored by the South Fork Natural History Museum (SoFo) and the Montauk Observatory.

Join SoFo and the Montauk Observatory for a night of stargazing! Montauk Observatory astronomers will set up their telescopes under SoFo’s dark skies and give guided tours of the heavens to all who attend. The first half-hour will consist of a brief lecture about stargazing, star-hopping, and general tips for observing. Then it’s out into the field for a look at the wonders of the night sky. Feel free to bring your own binoculars or set up your own telescope, even do some astrophotography. Bring something to sit on if you plan to stay for a while. On the day of the event, you may check viewing conditions on the Clear Sky Chart on Montauk Observatory’s website. Please note: The star party will not be held if it is raining or if it is cloudy. This is a free program, but donations for the Montauk Observatory would be appreciated. For further information, visit the Montauk Observatory’s website: www.MontaukObservatory.com.

Advance reservations are required for all events. For more information, reservations, and directions to meeting places, please call: (631) 537-9735.

Jul
21
Sat
Birding with Frank: Shorebirds: Adults/Children 8+
Jul 21 @ 9:00 am

Photo Credit: Hans Hillewaert

Walk Leader: Frank Quevedo, Executive Director, South Fork Natural History Museum (SoFo).

Summer is the best time to view some of the fifty or more species of shorebirds that comb the beaches, sand flats, and marshes of Long Island. On this walk, we will visit Shinnecock Bay in Southampton and focus on plovers, yellowlegs, oystercatchers, and sandpipers as they feed by wading in shallow waters. So grab your binoculars, scopes, sunscreen, and a field guide to birds of Eastern North America, if you have one, and let’s hit the bay.

Advance reservations are required for all events. For more information, reservations, and directions to meeting places, please call: (631) 537-9735.

Lost Ladybug Search at Quail Hill Farm: All Ages
Jul 21 @ 10:00 am – 12:00 pm

Leader: Dr. Leslie Allee, Director of Curriculum Development and Outreach, Cornell’s Lost Ladybug Project.

Cosponsored by the Peconic Land Trust and the South Fork Natural History Museum.

The Peconic Land Trust and the South Fork Natural History Museum (SoFo) have teamed up with Dr. Leslie Allee of Cornell University for our annual search for “lost ladybugs.”  Help us look for the extremely rare 9-spotted ladybug, New York State’s official insect, and aid in Dr. Allee’s research. Native ladybugs were once very common but are now extremely rare, while ladybugs from other parts of the world have greatly increased. You will search for and gently capture ladybugs at the farm to be identified and then released. Children must be accompanied by an adult. This program is free. The rain date is Wednesday, July 25.  Please park on Deep Lane and meet at the farmstand. For more information on the “Lost Ladybug Project” visit www.lostladybug.org

Advance reservations are required for all events. For more information, reservations, and directions to meeting places, please call: (631) 537-9735.

The Nature of Juggling: Adults/Children 8+
Jul 21 @ 10:30 am

Program Leader: Miles Todaro, South Fork Natural History Museum Environmental Educator and experienced juggler.

Humans are the only animal known that are capable of juggling, and we’ve been doing it for hundreds of years. What sorts of adaptations do we have that make this unique ability possible? What kind of unique abilities do other animals have, and why do they have them? Join Miles to learn the answers to these questions, and afterwards learn how to juggle!

Advance reservations are required for all events. For more information, reservations, and directions to meeting places, please call: (631) 537-9735.

Family Salt Marsh Exploration at Munn Point Preserve
Jul 21 @ 6:15 pm

Exploration Leader: Crystal Oakes, South Fork Natural History Museum Environmental Educator

A salt marsh is where fresh water from the land meets the salt water of the ocean. Because two very different habitats meet at the salt marsh, it is a very rich, though difficult, habitat to live in. Join Crystal to watch the creatures of the salt marsh: herons, egrets, and Osprey searching for food. We’ll look for shells and other treasures on the beach and, with a two-person seine net, pull up secrets from the water. Binoculars, magnifiers, and sample jars will help us appreciate the wonderful salt marsh life we bring up in our seining net before we return what we’ve studied to the water. This is a great opportunity to learn the fascinating ways the animals and plants of the salt marsh survive the extreme temperature changes and the differences of high and low tide, and how they are able to live in variable salinities. Please dress to get wet!

Advance reservations are required for all events. For more information, reservations, and directions to meeting places, please call: (631) 537-9735.

Jul
22
Sun
Dragonfly/Damselfly Walk and Identification: Adults/Children 8+
Jul 22 @ 10:00 am

Walk Leader: Annette DeGiovine Oliveira.

Annette has been surveying dragonflies and damselflies since 2005 and was trained for the “New York Dragonfly and Damselfly Survey,” a project of the NYS Department of Environmental Conservation and the NY Natural Heritage Program. On this walk to a local pond, she will cover the basics of Odonate life cycle, habitat, and identification, while instructing you on observation skills and the proper technique of netting, for studying, then releasing, these amazing flying insects. Wear clothing and footwear you don’t mind getting wet.

Advance reservations are required for all events. For more information, reservations, and directions to meeting places, please call: (631) 537-9735.

Wolves— Fact vs. Fiction and What You Need To Know: Adults/Teens/Children 8+
Jul 22 @ 2:00 pm

Photo Credit: USFWS

Program Presenter: Molly Vorhaus, South Fork Natural History Museum Summer Intern.

Throughout time, wolves have been important animals in both the natural environment and human society. Viewed as predators, symbols, family members and, more recently, pets, wolves have played an important role in the human understanding of both nature and social institutions. As a result of children’s literature, conflict with livestock ranchers and other human communities, and media portrayals of wolves as predators, villains, and a vicious species, wolves have been the target of hunting for many years. However, wolves are a keystone species, having important roles to maintain biodiversity in various environments. Removal of wolves from their rightful homes in the wilderness is detrimental to these animals as individuals and the ecosystem around them, and contributes to biodiversity loss. Yet while there are thousands of wild wolves in North America, there are far more wolves (and wolf-dog hybrids) living in captivity. The aim for this presentation is to bring awareness of the species that played the role of neighbor to those of us living in Long Island for many years. We will explore the various roles of wolves in multiple societies and why they are important members of our ecosystems. Further, we will also explore the various viewpoints that encourage harmful practices against wolves. Whether they are views that support the wolf and wolf-hybrid pet-trade, or the hunting of wolves, Molly’s presentation seeks to enlighten how the various viewpoints can be detrimental to wolves, and what we can do to stop this perpetuation of harmful practices. Molly is studying wolves for her senior thesis at Gettysburg College.

Advance reservations are required for all events. For more information, reservations, and directions to meeting places, please call: (631) 537-9735.

Jul
25
Wed
COME DRAW WITH US!—Art Workshop: Adults and Teens
Jul 25 @ 10:30 am

Drawing by Susan Rubin

Workshop Leader: Muriel Appelbaum. Muriel is a working artist with an MFA in Studio Art from Pratt Institute in NYC. She mostly draws from nature—landscapes, people, and live animals. See her artwork at www.murielappelbaum.com.

Drawing is another way of tuning into the natural world around us. When we look closely at a landscape or a seascape, we notice more about it. The same thing happens when we look closely at a leaf or at an animal. Notice how very different the shape of a box turtle’s shell is from the shell of a water turtle. Right! I guess that’s why it’s called a box turtle. Once I observed the difference in the shape of the two turtle shells, I could draw the outlines of the two shells. And the more I looked at the turtles, the more I saw. Observing differences is a good way to start tuning in to nature. If I had a dark-blue colored pencil, and one with a lighter blue lead, I could easily show myself the difference between the two colors on a piece of paper. Then I could look at the blue sky and notice it’s a different color near the horizon, compared to straight up. Now I could use the two blue colors in my drawing to show the difference. Shapes, colors, shadows—they tell us more about the natural world. I will be leading a drawing workshop at SoFo on most Wednesdays in July and August and on most weekends starting in September. Join us when you can. We’ll be using our observational skills to draw the natural world around us.

Advance reservations are required for all events. For more information, reservations, and directions to meeting places, please call: (631) 537-9735.

 

Additional Program Dates:

Wednesday, August 1— 10:30am

Wednesday, August 8—10:30am

Wednesday, August 15— 10:30am

Wednesday, August 22—10:30am

Wednesday, August 29— 10:30am

Saturday, September 15—10:30am

Sunday, September 23— 10:30am

Saturday, September 29—10:30am