Calendar

Oct
21
Sun
CANCELLED
Montauk Trail Hike with the CCOM at Money Pond: All Ages
Oct 21 @ 10:00 am

Cosponsored by South Fork Natural History Museum & Concerned Citizens of Montauk

Hike Leaders: Eleni Nikolopoulos, Environmental Educator at South Fork Natural History Museum and Kate Rossi-Snook, Environmental Advocate at Concerned Citizens of Montauk

Join the Concerned Citizens of Montauk and the South Fork Natural History Museum for a fast-paced trail walk along Montauk’s beautiful Money Pond trail. We will be joined by a representative of CCOM who will tell us about how the organization is working to help the community preserve the natural environment of Montauk and the importance of water quality in our local ecosystems. This trail walk will be full of interesting conversation while we take in the beautiful Montauk scenery. Join us for this free hike, and get to know what’s going on in Long Island’s easternmost community.

Advance reservations are required for all events. For more information, reservations, and directions to meeting places, please call: (631) 537-9735.

Downstairs/Touch Tank Closed for Program: 10:30-11:30am
Oct 21 @ 10:30 am – 11:30 am
Feeding Time at the Museum: Who Eats Whom? Children Ages 3 – 5
Oct 21 @ 10:30 am

Workshop Leaders: South Fork Natural History Museum Environmental Educators

Get ready for a little behind-the-scenes tour at SoFo. Our educators will give you a chance to see how we prepare the food for our animals to eat; then you’ll get up close and personal with the animals as they are fed. We’ll investigate food webs and the structural differences between carnivores, omnivores, and herbivores.

Advance reservations are required for all events. For more information, reservations, and directions to meeting places, please call: (631) 537-9735.

Downstairs/Touch Tank Closed for Program: 2-3pm
Oct 21 @ 2:00 pm – 3:00 pm
Feeding Time at the Museum: Who Eats Whom? Children Ages 6+
Oct 21 @ 2:00 pm

Workshop Leaders: South Fork Natural History Museum Environmental Educators

Get ready for a little behind-the-scenes tour at SoFo. Our educators will give you a chance to see how we prepare the food for our animals to eat; then you’ll get up close and personal with the animals as they are fed. We’ll investigate food webs and the structural differences between carnivores, omnivores, and herbivores.

Advance reservations are required for all events. For more information, reservations, and directions to meeting places, please call: (631) 537-9735.

Oct
24
Wed
Full Hunter’s Moon Hike with Friends of the Long Pond Greenbelt: Family
Oct 24 @ 7:00 pm – 8:00 pm

Photo Credit: Michael Gil

Co-sponsored by Friends of the Long Pond Greenbelt & South Fork Natural History Museum (SoFo)

Hike Leader: Jean Dodds, Secretary, Friends of the Long Pond Greenbelt

Native Americans named this bright moon for obvious reasons. Leaves are falling from trees, deer are fattened, and it’s time to begin storing meat for the long winter ahead. Because the fields were traditionally harvested in late September or early October, hunters could easily see fox and other animals that came out to eat the fallen grains. Join us for this leisurely paced one-hour hike in Vineyard Field, the field behind the South Fork Natural History Museum (SoFo), and afterward for some convivial conversation and refreshments in the moonlight.

Advance reservations are required for all events. For more information, reservations, and directions to meeting places, please call: (631) 537-9735.

Oct
25
Thu
Museum Closed for School Group Visit: 10am-2pm
Oct 25 @ 10:00 am – 2:00 pm
Oct
27
Sat
Birding with Frank at Good Ground Park: Family
Oct 27 @ 10:00 am

Photo Credit: Kyle Campbell

Cosponsored by South Fork Natural History Museum & the Town of Southampton

Program Leader: Frank Quevedo, Executive Director, South Fork Natural History Museum

Our woodlands are home to dozens of birds that only flourish in densely wooded areas. These birds include the Chickadee, Carolina Wren, Northern Cardinal and Tufted Titmouse. Searching for these birds, or any others, in the dense, deciduous forest can be a challenge, but if you are familiar with their songs and calls identification will be much easier. Join Frank on this walk to learn how bird sounds can be your biggest ally and which tools you can acquire to help enhance your birding skills. Bring your binoculars, a scope — if you have one—insect repellent, and a field guide to birds of eastern North America, if you have one.

Advance reservations are required for all events. For more information, reservations, and directions to meeting places, please call: (631) 537-9735.

Nature Walk at Scallop Pond with Dr. Keith Serafy: Family/Children 6+
Oct 27 @ 10:00 am

Walk Leader: Dr. Keith Serafy. Dr. Serafy is a marine invertebrate zoologist who has recently retired after teaching for 27 years at Southampton College of LIU and the last 12 years at Long Island University, Brooklyn. He has lived on the East End since 1973

Join Marine Zoologist Dr. Keith Serafy for a 90-minute walk through the Nature Conservancy’s Scallop Pond Preserve. The walk begins in an upland oak forest and leads to a spectacular saltmarsh that surrounds Scallop Pond. Dr. Serafy will identify the characteristic plants and animals of both habitats and discuss their special adaptations for living in these environments. Bring your camera and binoculars for the beautiful fall scenery.

Advance reservations are required for all events. For more information, reservations, and directions to meeting places, please call: (631) 537-9735.

Persistence of the Northern Long-eared Bat on Long Island: A Source of Hope for a Threatened Species—Talk by Ph.D. Candidate Samantha Hoff: Adults & Teens
Oct 27 @ 2:00 pm

Photo Credit: USFWS

Program Presenter: Samantha Hoff, wildlife technician for the New York State Department of Environmental Conservation working in the field of bat conservation for the past five years, and PhD student at the University at Albany. Her research involves studying northern long-eared bat populations across coastal communities in the northeast, including Long Island, Martha’s Vineyard, and Nantucket.

Formerly a common species, northern long-eared bats are now rarely encountered on the landscape throughout much of their range, due to devastating population declines resulting from white-nose syndrome. Since the arrival of this invasive fungal disease in 2006, northern long-eared bats have experienced rapid extirpation from hibernation sites, leading to a federal listing of Threatened in 2015. Despite this trend, recent evidence shows populations off the coast of the northeastern US are persisting despite exposure to the disease. Ongoing research investigating the mechanisms allowing these populations to persist includes tracking bats to find hibernation sites, studying winter activity patterns and the availability of prey, and testing for prevalence of the disease. Whichever factors may be contributing to survival, it is clear that Long Island is an important place for bat conservation!

Advance reservations are required for all events. For more information, reservations, and directions to meeting places, please call: (631) 537-9735.